"Softness of Bodies" Movie Review

"Softness of Bodies" Movie Review

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Poetry can be an enthralling style of artistic expression. Particularly when it’s delivered by a narcissistic sociopath-ish kleptomaniac. In Softness of Bodies, this is at least one way to describe Charlie, an American poet residing in Germany who finds out she’s a finalist for a major poetry grant.

At a poetry reading, Charlie recites, “I know birds shouldn’t be chased out of a sanctuary and shot. It’s just that it’s so much fun to do it anyway.” It’s a powerful statement to end the scene on because it captures so much of who Charlie is. She shouldn’t date a man she knows has a girlfriend. She shouldn’t fool around with the ex-boyfriend. She shouldn’t compulsively lie and steal. But Charlie derives an inexplicable pleasure from these actions, and Dasha Nekrasova’s performance in the role is nothing less than superb.

Besides her monotonous style of poetry reading, Charlie’s interactions with people helps keep Softness of Bodies intriguing. Like the occasional appearance of her arch-rival, Sylvie, who she’s constantly concerned with being better than. Or her roommate, who has her complex character so well figured out, he knows exactly how to communicate with her in her most unreasonable moments.

It’s not a film for everyone, but being invested into Charlie’s life and worldview is the key to enjoying Softness of Bodies. Which is fitting since she demands everyone’s attention anyway, and as far as I’m concerned, that dynamic is what makes Softness of Bodies its own enthralling work of art.

Acting and Casting - 2 | Visual Effects and Editing - 2 | Story and Message - 2 | Entertainment Value - 1 | Music Score and Soundtrack - 1 | Reviewer's Preference - 2 | What does this mean?

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